Reject Birthday Topic

The place for respectful and reverent discussion of Reject drivers and teams, whether profiled or not as yet

Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 30 Jan 2011, 21:24

Today is the birthday of 3 drivers, 2 of them rejects.

Gianbattista Guidotti would have turned 110. His F1 career is very limited. As a starter, there was only the 1947 Belgian GP, where he managed 3rd in his factory Alfa Romeo. He was entered for 2 championship rounds: the 1950 British GP and the 1951 Swiss GP, both times by the Alfa Romeo factory team. However, it was only as a reserve driver. Guidotti died on July 2nd 1994, aged 93.

Not a reject, but deserves a mention. Paul Frère would have turned 94 today. Born in Le Havre, France, Paul was first a journalist, who just happened to drive an HWM in the 1952 GP des Frontières. He won the race. He then entered 11 championship GPs from 1952 to 1956, scoring in the 1952 Belgian GP (5th), 1955 Belgian GP (4th) and 1956 Belgian GP (2nd). He became the most successful Belgian driver before Olivier Gendebien made his appearance. Frère then concentrated on sports cars, winning the 1960 Le Mans 24h with Gendebien, before retiring in 1966. Paul died on February 23rd 2008 in Saint-Paul-de-Vence, France, aged 91.

Finally, Bruce Johnstone turns 74. born in Durban the South African only entered one F1 race, the 1962 South African GP, aged 25. His privately entered BRM qualfied 17th and eventually finished a respectable 9th position. His best F1 result came at the non-championship 1962 International Gold Cup, at Oulton Park, driving a factory BRM. Bruce finished 4th.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 01 Feb 2011, 03:40

This will be my final birthday post in a while: I've just been given a huge assignment for school due for Friday, and I'll have to go on the forums, but not to post huge stuff.

Anyway, January 31st is the birthday of 5 F1 drivers, 2 of which rejects. The other 3, I feel, deserve a mention.

Bill Cantrell would have turned 103. The American, born in West Point, Kentucky, only entered 2 Indy 500s, in 1950 and 1952. His only start came in 1950, where his race ended after just 3 laps. Cantrell died on January 22nd 1996 in Madison, Indiana, aged 87.

Jo Bonnier would have turned 81. He deserves a mention purely for topping the all-time standings of the Johnny Claes Trophy. Born in Stockholm, Jo's career would last 15 years: from 1956 to 1971. He started in 1956, with a one-off for Maserati. The next year, he drove both for himself and for Scuderia Centro Sud. This stayed the same until late-1958, when BRM signed him as a works driver. This deal saw Jo take his only podium and win and the 1959 Dutch GP. For 1961 and 1962, Jo was a Porsche works driver before signing for Rob Walker, with whom he drove until 1966, when reverted to his own team, Ecurie Bonnier, until his retirement. Jo was much more active in sports cars, and that's where Bonnier would die. On June 11th 1972, at the Le Mans 24h, Jo hit the back of bacjmarker Florian Vetsch's Ferrari and went flying into the woods on the side of the track. Bonnier was 42.

Ernesto "Tino" Brambilla turns 77 today. Vittorio's older brother was born in Monza, but all these connections meant nothing about actual success. His first F1 entry was the 1963 Italian GP, for Scuderia Centro Sud. Brambilla failed to qualify for the race, however. He wasn't seen again until 1969, when he again entered the Italian GP, this time as a factory Ferrari driver! However, things wouldn't last long, as Tino had to give up his car before the race to Pedro Rodriguez, a broken arm forcing him to sit out. Brambilla was never given an F1 chance again.

Mauro Baldi turns 57 today. Born in Reggio-Emilia, Baldi isn't a reject, but can be considered a lucky bastard. His first F1 chance came in 1981, being entered for Alfa Romeo, but he eventually had to withdraw. Mauro came back in 1982, for Arrows this time. That year, Mauro scored 2 6ths, in the Netherlands and Austria. The next year, Mauro returned to Alfa, scoring a 6th in Monaco and a 5th in the Netherlands. That was his only success in F1. He returned in 1984 and 1985 for Spirit. He was to be the lead driver for the 1986 stillborn Ekstrom project, before being signed by Brabham for 1987. However, Baldi was sacked before the first race. He would later go on to become a very volatile racer, his greatest success no doubt being his 1994 Le Mans victory with Hurley Haywood and Yannick Dalmas.

JJ Lehto turns 45 today. Born in Espoo, I'm including him as he deserves a mention here. His F1 debut came in 1989 for Onyx, where he stayed until the end of 1990, when then team were known as Monteverdi. Lehto then signed for 2 years at BMS Scuderia Italia, where he scored his only podium: 3rd at the 1991 San Marino GP. Those, however, would be his only points finishe for the team. In 1993, he joined Sauber, where he scored 5 points for the team's debut season. For 1994, he joined Benetton, but a huge testing shunt saw his first race delayed until San Marino, when he was involved in a crash that injured a few spectators on the front stretch. Later in the season, in Canada, JJ scored his last F1 points with a 6th place. He then drove the last two races of the season for Sauber, before ending his F1 career. Lehto would go on to win the 2004 ALMS title and the 1995 and 2005 Le Mans 24h.

However, one F1 driver also died on this day.

Harry Blanchard died on this day 51 years ago. Born on June 13th 1929 in Burlington, the American only entered one F1 race: the 1959 US Grand Prix. In his privately entered Porsche, Blanchard qualified in 16th and finished 7th. Blanchard died just a few months later in Buenos Aires during the 1000km race. Harry was 30 years old.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 05 Feb 2011, 02:31

Alright, I'm back! i'm going to post every driver who had a birthday, died on said day, or GPs that happened on that day from February 1st to 3rd, and I will update the post with more info until I've reached that day.

February 1st is the birthday of 4 F1 rejects.

George Bainbridge would have turned 95. The Briton only entered 5 non-championship races from 1946 to 1949, managing 6th in the 1947 British Empire Trophy and 3rd in the 1946 Gransden Lodge Trophy. Bainbridge died on April 2nd 2002, aged 86.

Ray Merrick would have turned 93 today. The Briton entered a sole non-championship race: the 1952 Ibsley F2 race. He withdrew before the start of the event. Merrick died on Spetember 12th 2003, aged 85.

John Coombs turns 89 today. Born in Great Britain, he entered 9 non-championship races from 1953 to 1959, with a best finish of 9th in the 1955 International Trophy.

Xavier Perrot would have turned 79 today. Born in Zurich, the Swiss only entered a non-championship race as a Formula 2 grid-filler. The race (the 1971 Jochen Rindt Memorial) saw him take 11th in his March entered by Jo Siffert. Xavier died on December 8th 2008 in Zurich, aged 76.

Deaths
Enrique Tintore
Harry Herkuleyns
Potsy Goacher
Harry Merkel
Ray Crawford
Dick Rathmann
Jim McWithey

February 2nd
Birthdays
Bertie Bradnack
George Tichenor
Tony Shelly
Roger Williamson

Deaths
Enrico Plate

February 3rd
Birthdays
Tony Gaze
Andre Loens
Johnny Moorhouse
Richard Utley
Chico Serra

Deaths
Johnny Claes
Paul Emery
Norm Hauser

February 4th is the birthday of 2 F1 rejects.

Van (no, that's not horrendous spelling on my part) Johnson would have turned 84 today. Born in Born in Greeley, he only entered one Indy 500, in 1958 driving a Kurtis Kraft 500C. He didn't qualify. Johnson died on July 19th 1959 in Williams Grove during a racing accident. He was 32 years old.

Giorgio Pantano turns 32 today. Born in Conselve, he was Italy's shining star in the junior series. That was before he got to F1. After countless testing, he finally began his F1 career for Jordan in 2004. His season was desastrous, only scoring 2 13ths in Sepang and at the Nurburgring before getting sacked to be replaced by Timo Glock, as his sponsors weren't paying up. He also won the prestigious Reject of the Year award. Later, Giorgio won the 2008 GP2 season, but couldn't secure a drive for 2009.

Two F1 rejects also died on this day.

Vittorio Marzotto died on this day 12 years ago. Born on June 13th 1922 in Italy, Vittorio entered cars under the Scuderia Marzotto banner. On one occasion, the 1952 French GP, Marzotto himself was his team's backup driver. However, he wasn't required for the weekend and never drove the car. In his sole F1 start, the non-championship 1952 Syracuse GP, Marzotto retired. Vittorio died aged 76.

Ernie McCoy died on this day 10 years ago. Born on February 19th 1921 in Reading, USA, McCoy entered 3 Indy 500s in his career: from 1953 to 1955. He qualified for two of them: 1953 and 1954. His races were moderatley successful, with 8th in 1953 and 16th in 1954. McCoy died in Port Orange, aged 79.

The 1979 Brazilian GP was held on February 4th.
Last edited by tommykl on 12 Feb 2011, 03:52, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 05 Feb 2011, 17:23

February 5th is the birthday of 2 F1 drivers. One of them a reject.

Alain de Changy would have turned 89 today. The Belgian, born in Brussels, was mainly a sportscar driver, who try his luck in open-wheelers in 1959. He entered the Monaco GP, where there were a huge amount of entrants for just 16 places. De Changy, in his Equipe Nationale Belge Cooper qualified 20th out of 24, tied for 19th with Lucien Bianchi, and less than a second of 16th placed Bruce Halford. De Changy then continued to race sportscars. Alain died on August 5th 1994 in Etterbeek, aged 72.

Hector Rebaque turns 56 today. Born in Mexico City, he's not a reject, but had a Morenoesque career in F1. His debut came in 1977, driving the Hesketh for 8 rounds. He only qualified once, however, 24th in Germany. He retired with battery problems. He returned the next year, when he drove his own Lotus 78. Low points: three consecutive DNPQs (from US West to Belgium) and a retirement due to physical exhaustion (Brazil). A high point: 4 finishes, including a glorious 6th in Germany, earning the Mexican 1 point. He returns the next year, in 1979, this time with a Lotus 79. A mediocre season saw 7th place in the Netherlands as best result. Towards the end of the year, Rebaque became the last driver to drive his own car in an F1 race, the Rebaque HR100 qualifying for the Canadian GP. However, Hector couldn't find a drive for 1980. His one-in-a-lifetime chance came at mid-season. Ricardo Zunino had been very disappointing in the Brabham, and Rebaque was offered a deal for the rest of the season. Needless to say, Hector duly signed the contract, scoring another 6th place in Canada. 1981 would be his best and last season in F1. While Piquet won the championship, Rebaque scored 3 4th places and a 5th to score 11 points and come 10th in the championship. However, this was considered average, at best, and Rebaque wasn't offered a drive for the next season. He turned to IndyCar, where a huge accident in Michigan saw him avoid ovals for the rest of his career. Two months later, Hector Rebaque takes a magnificent first career win in any type of racing in Road America. The 29-year-old celebrates by announcing his retirement from racing. In 1983, however, he drove his vary last race in the non-championship Race of Champions, where he qualified 10th only to retire.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 06 Feb 2011, 20:27

February 6th is one F1 reject's birthday.

American Cliff Griffith would have turned95 today. Cliff attempted many times to qualify for the Indy 500...Born in Nineveh, he entered the famous race 7 times: from 1950 to 1954 and from 1956 to 1957, qualifying thrice (1951, 1952 and 1956). His best 500 was undoubtedly in 1952: he qualified a career best 9th and finished a career best 9th. He died on January 23rd 1996 in Winchester, aged 79.

However, 5 drivers died on January 23rd.

Willard Cantrell died on this day 25 years ago. Born on December 6th 1914 in Anaheim, the "silver fox" entered only one Indy 500, in 1953. However, his Pankratz, entered by Emmett Malloy, failed to qualify. Later on, Cantrell became the west coast's USAC supervisor. Cantrell died aged 71.

Roger Laurent died on this day 14 years ago. Born on February 23rd 1913 in Liège, Laurent was first a motorcycle driver, winning the Belgian championship 5 times. He first entered Formula 1 in 1951, for non-chamionship races, in which he took 6th position. His only championdhip races came in 1952, in Belgium and Germany in which he came 12th (in an HWM) and a magnificent 6th (in a private Ferrari). However, his F1 high point came in 1953, where he clinched 2nd place in the Grand Prix des Frontières. In 1955, his career came to a halt when he broke his leg during a race at Bari. He returned the next year, however, taking his secong 4th place in Le Mans. Laurent died in Uccle, aged 83.

Eric Glasby died on this day 13 years ago. Born on November 2nd 1916 in East London, South Africa (though he held a Rhodesian passport), he only entered non-championship races: the 1962 Rand and Natal GPs. However, he didn't qualify for either of them. Glasby died in Tasmania, Australia, aged 87.

Umberto Maglioli died on this day 12 years ago. Born on June 5th 1928 in Bioglio, Maglioli only drove for the ferrari and Maserati factoryteams, bar a one-off for Scuderia Guastalla at the 1956 British GP. His only points finishes were podiums, but both were shared. He shared the Ferrari with Gonzalez for the 1954 Italian GP, and with Giuseppe Farina and Maurice Trintignant in the 1955 Argentine GP. These podiums gave him a total of 3.33 points. His best non-shared result was 6th at the 1955 Italian GP, still with Ferrari. In his three races in a Maserati, he couldn't finsh. He kept racing in sportscars until 1970, winning the Targa Florio in 1953 and 1970, the 1954 Buenos Aires 1000km and the 1954 Carrera Panamericana. Maglioli died in Monza, aged 70.

Tony Rolt died on this day 3 years ago. Born in Bordon on October 16th 1918, he was Peter Walker's relief driver for the 1950 British GP, before entering his home GP again in 1953 and 1955, retiring in all of them. His best year was definitely 1953. When the world championship ran to F2 rules, every F2 race was a non-championship race. Rolt won 6 of them, also winning the Le Mans 24h with Duncan Hamilton. Rolt is better known for taking part in the failed attempt to escape from the Colditz castle during WW2, by using a glider. He is also known for being the last surviving driver to have taken part in F1's first ever championship GP. He died aged 89.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby Aerospeed » 07 Feb 2011, 03:42

Technically JJ Lehto isn't a reject...
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 07 Feb 2011, 03:59

I know, I just feel like drivers who spent a good deal of time at the back of grid and got out of rejectdom because of luck and/or justly getting picked up by a good team deserve a mention, at least.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 11 Feb 2011, 01:34

OK, same deal as last time I had to take a break.

February 7th
Birthdays
Christian Klien

Deaths
Claude Storez
Curd Bardi-Barry
Jack Fairman

The 1960 Argentine GP was held on February 7th

February 8th
Birthdays
Robert Brunet
Raph
Mike Magill
Cliff Allison

Deaths
Kurt Kuhnke
Luis Bueno

February 9th
Birthdays
Fergus Anderson
Tony Maggs

Deaths
Hans Stuck

February 10th is the birthday of 4 F1 Rejects.

Franco Cortese would have turned 108. Born in Oggebbio Novara, the Italian only entered non-championship races from 1946 to 1952, where he had some success. Driving private Ferraris and Maseratis, he managed a couple of 5ths, a 4th and a glorious podium in the 1949 Czech GP. Cortese died on November 13th 1986. He was 83 years old.

Danny Kladis would have turned 94 today. Born in Crystal City, Missouri, he entered 5 Indy 500s: 1950, 1952, 1954, 1955 and 1957. His only qualification, however, came in 1954, where he managed 30th out of the 33 starters in his Bromme. However, an oil leak ended his race on lap 104. Kladis died on April 26th 2009 in Joliet, Illinois, aged 92.

Eddie Johnson would have turned 92. Born in Richmond, he entered every Indy 500 from 1952 to 1960. He qualified for all of them, a consistent midfielder, occasionally capable of scoring a good result: he took 7th in 1952, 9th in 1958 and 8th in 1959. However, his best result saw him become one of 314, with 6th place seeing him score one point. Eddie died on June 30th 1974 in Cleveland in a plane accident. Johnson was 55.

Theo Fitzau would have turned 88 years old. Born in Kothen, East Germany, he was a mildly successful F2 driver in Germany, eventually entering the 1953 Germany GP as a normal F2 race. Qualifying in 21st, Theo would find himself in last position before too long, retiring from a blown engine on lap 3. Fitzau died on March 18th 1982 in Gross Gerau, West Germany. He was 59 years old.

Two F1 drivers, including one reject died on this day, coincidentally in the same year year: 1987.

Robert O'Brien was born on March 11th 1908 in Lyndhurst, New Jersey. The American only entered one race: the 1952 Belgian GP in a private Simca Gordini. Qualifying in 22nd, he would eventually finish 14th. O'Brien died in Hackensack, New Jersey, aged 78.

Andy Linden, born on April 5th 1922 in Brownsville, entered every Indy 500 from 1950 to 1957, qualifying for all bar 1950. He was usually a frontrunner in a Kurtis Kraft, his preferred car, with which he took 6th in 1955 and 5t hin 1957. His best result, however came in his only showing in a Sherman, taking 4th in 1951. Andy died in Torrance, aged 64.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 12 Feb 2011, 03:35

February 11th is the birthday of a reject legend, although not technically a reject.

While John Surtees turns 77, Roberto Moreno turns 52 today. Born in Rio de Janeiro, Roberto drove for AGS, Coloni, EuroBrun, Andrea Moda and Forti. His F1 career started in 1982, as a one-off Lotus entry for the Dutch GP. He qualified 30th, and therefore couldn't start the race. His next chance came in 1987, taking on the AGS for the last two races of the season, managing a magnificent 6th in Australia! He returned once more in 1989, this time for Coloni. He only qualified thrice in the first 8 races, retiring each time before getting relegated to pre-qualifying, out of which he got once, for the Portuguese GP, qualifying for the race, in which he retired as well. In 1990, he turned to EuroBrun, qualifying 16th and finishing 13th in the first race. However, he would only qualify once more throughout the season. For the last two races, he was called to replace injured Alessandro Nannini in the Benetton, and duly took 2nd and 7th. The next year, still for Benetton, he managed a 5th and two 4ths, but went through a straight swap with Jordan after Belgium against Michael Schumacher. He lasted two unsuccessful races for the Irish team before moving to Minardi, finishing 16th in Australia. In 1992, after Andrea Moda had fired Caffi and Bertaggia, they went for Moreno and Perry McCarthy. They had a disastrous season, Moreno only managing to qualify once, at Monaco. His last chance came in 1995 for the fledgling Forti team. Roberto, however, only managed one fourteenth place as best result. the 36-year-old was never seen again in F1.

One F1 reject also died on this day.

Marshall Teague passed away 52 years ago. Born on May 22nd 1921 in Daytona, Marshall entered 5 Indy 500s: 1953, 1954, 1956, 1957 and 1958. He qualified in 1953, 1954 and 1957. He was usually in the midfield, his best result coming in 1957, with 7th in his Kurtis Kraft 500D. Teague died at his place of birth, Daytona, while testing a Kurtis Kraft, aged 37.

The 1973 Brazilian GP was held on February 11th.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 12 Feb 2011, 19:28

February 12th is the birthday of 4 F1 rejects.

Jack Turner would have turned 91. Born in Seattle, he entered every Indy 500 from 1956 to 1960, qualifying for all but the latter. Turner wasn't successful, however, his only finish yielding an 11th place. Jack died on September 10th 2004 in Seattle, aged 84.

Lex Davison would have turned 88. The Australian entered two non-championship races in 1961 driving an Aston Martin for the Ecurie Australie: the British Empire Trophy, where he retired, and the Guard's Trophy, where he took 6th position. Lex died on February 20th 1965, aged 42.

Patrick Gaillard turns 59. Born in Paris, the Frenchman had a limited career in Formula 1, with 5 entries for Ensign in 1979, from France to the Netherlands. He qualified twice, in Great Britain and Austria. He retired due to suspension failure in Austria, but finished 13th in Great Britain. The next year, he entered the Spanish GP, where he managed 6th place. However, the FIA then declared the race a non-championship event. Gaillard can now be found as driving instructor for the AGS driving school.

Finally, Toranosuke "Tiger" Takagi turns 37 today. Born in Shizuoka, he was given two years as a Formula One driver, but didn't do much. He first drove in 1998 for Tyrrell, where a mediocre season saw 9th place in Great Britain and Italy as high points. The next year, he made the switch to Arrows. Pace-wise, it got worse, but high attrition in the early races saw Takagi take 8th in Brazil and 7th in Australia. On the other hand, the car failed to finish 11 times out of 16, and Tora was fired. After this, he returned to Formula Nippon, winning the 2000 title before turning to CART and the IRL. After being deducted several points for dangerous driving, he returned once more to Japan in 2005, where he still drives to this day.

Two drivers also died on this day.

Dennis Poore died 24 years ago today. Born on August 19th 1916 in London, Poore was first a businessman with a talent for car-racing. After buying Autosport magazine, he won the 1950 British hill-climb championship, and turned to F2. In 1952, he entered the championship British and Italian GPs. Before finishing a mediocre 12th in Monza, Dennis managed a magnificent 4th position in Silverstone, outclassing some of the dominant Ferraris, and even running 3rd for half the race! Poore later went ont to win the Newcastle Journal Trophy that same year before turning to sportscars, winning the 1955 Goodwood 9h with Peter Walker. Poore died in Kensington, aged 70.

Archie butterworth died on this day 6 years ago. Born on June 19th 1912 in Waterford, the man better known for creating the Butterworth engine also entered 6 local non-championship races in 1950 and 1951, but his car, the AJB, never once made the race. Archie died aged 92.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 14 Feb 2011, 02:28

February 13th is the birthday of three F1 rejects.

Mike Oliver turns 90 today. Born in Farnborough, the Briton entered non-championship events, taking 3rd in the 1952 Newcastle Journal Trophy before entering his home race in 1956 in a Connaught. However, Mike had to withdraw before the race.

Willi Heeks would have turned 89. Born in Moorlage, the German never left his home country to race. He was an F2 driver, taking advantage of the fact that F1 ran to F2 rules in 1952 and 1953 to enter the German GP. In 1952, he qualified his AFM in 9th place, but retired due to engine problems. The next year, it was his Veritas' transmission troubles that ended his race after starting in 18th. Willi died on August 13th 1996 in Bocholt, aged 74.

Jim Crawford would have turned 63. Born in Dunfermline, he was a Formula Atlantic stalwart. His success led to a two-race deal for Lotus for the 1975 British and Italian GPs. After qualifying 25th both times, he managed 13th in Italy, but was one of the many victims of the Silverstone weather, crashing like many others. After F1, he returned to Formula Atlantic, eventually moving to America in the 1980's to drive in Can-Am and later in IndyCar, where he would finish 6th in the 1988 Indy 500. After his retirement in 1995, Jim dedicated his life to fishing. He died on August 6th 2002 in Tierra Verde from liver failure, aged 54.

Two F1 drivers also died on this day, although none of them are rejects.

Paul Russo died on this day 35 years ago. Born on April 10th 1914 in Kenosha, Wisconsin, he drove in the Indy 500 from 1950 to 1959 for Nichels and Kurtis Kraft, eventually scoring 2 4ths and a 2nd for 8.5 total points. Paul died in Daytona, aged 61.

Maurice Trintignant died on this day 6 years ago. Born on October 30th 1917 in Sainte-Cecile-Les-Vignes, his career spanned from 1950 to 1964 when it comes to championship races. His career actually started in 1938! In the championship, he successively drove for Gordini, Louis Rosier, Ferrari, Vanwall, Bugatti, Rob Walker, Scuderia Centro Sud, BRM, Aston Martin, Scuderia Serenissima, Reg Parnell and himself. This gave him two victories, both at Monaco. In 1955, with Ferrari, and 1958 with Rob Walker. He scored a total of 10 podium and 72.33 points in 81 starts. He died in Nimes, aged 87.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 16 Feb 2011, 01:33

Once again, a one-day break for me.

February 14th
Births
Bayliss Levrett
Ricardo Rodriguez
Ronnie Peterson
Michael Ammermuller

Deaths
Piero Scotti
Cal Niday

February 15th is the birthday of 6 F1 drivers, 4 of them rejects.

Chas Mortimer would have turned 98. Born in Great Britain, he entered two non-championship races: the 1946 Gransden Lodge Trophy, in an Alta, and the 1950 Jersey Road Race, in an HWM. His best result result came in the latter, with 10th place. Chas died on August 5th 1996, aged 83.

Earl Motter would have turned 92. Born in Fresno, the American entered just one Indy 500, in 1959. However, his Kuzma didn't qualify. He died on November 28th 1992 in Los Angeles, aged 73.

Hans Blees would have turned 91. Born in Dusseldorf, he entered one championship race, the 1953 German GP in an AFM. However, he had to withdraw. In non-championship races, he came 10th in the ADAC Eifelrennen, an F2 race, that same year. Blees died on March 18th 1994 in Dusseldorf, aged 74.

Merlyn "Doc" Shanebrook would have turned 89. Born in South Bend, the American entered two Indy 500s in 1951 and 1952. He qualified neither the Stevens nor the Pawl. Shanebrook died on October 1st 1979 in Livingston, aged 57.

Graham Hill would have turned 82. Born in Hampstead, he is generally considered as one of the greatest drivers ever, and the only driver to ever complete the "Triple Crown of Motorsports", that is to win either the world championship or the Monaco, the Indy 500 and the Le Mans 24h. His first F1 drive came in 1958, driving the factory Lotus alongside Cliff Allison, Alan Stacey and Innes Ireland. In 1960, he signed for BRM, with whom he would stay for seven seasons, winning the driver's title in 1962. In 1967, he signed to drive for Lotus again, alongside the great Jim Clark. While Clark wouldn't win another title, Hill won his second championship in 1968. In the 1969 United States GP, Graham was the victim of a horrific crash in which he broke both legs. This would trigger his descent, and he signed for Rob Walker the next year, where he scored a measly 7 points before moving to Brabham for two years, scoring just 6 points. In 1973, Graham created his own team, Embassy-Hill, with whom he would score his last point in the 1974 Swedish GP. His last race was the 1975 Monaco GP. After failing to qualify for the race he had won five times, he retired from driving. On November 25th 1975, after a day of testing at the Paul-Ricard with his team, Hill was piloting his jet back to Great Britain, but, amidst the fog, the plane crashed down in Arkley. Hill was 46 years old.

Alexander Wurz turns 37 today. Born in Waidhofen, Austria, he first tried his hand at BMX, winningthe world championship. The next year, he turned to racing. In 1996, after a stellar rise through the junior ranks, Team Joest offered him a drive for the ITC. Alex then won the 1996 Le Mans 24h with Manuel Reuter and Davy Jones. The next season, Wurz drove in the FIA GT championship. Mid-season, Benetton frontman Gerhard Berger felt ill, and missed three races. Flavio Briatore then called up Wurz to drive. At just his third Grand Prix, Alex finished third in Great Britain. Berger retiring at the end of the season, Wurz was offered a full-time drive for 1998. In 1998, he managed a wonderful 17 points, but only three the next year. In 2000, a sole fifth in Italy was not enough to save him from the sack, and F1 Rejects' Reject of the Year award. He immediately got snapped up by McLaren as test driver. In 2005, Juan Pablo Montoya got a "tennis injury", and Wurz was called up to drive in San Marino. He finished 4th, but Button's disqualification elevated him to 3rd, 8 years after his previous podium! At the end of 2005, he left McLaren to test for williams, eventually getting the full-time seat for 2007. His season was full of high points and low points. Low points: three retirements due to accidents. High points: a daring strategy giving him another third place in Canada. In the end, he scored 13 points. However, his career was over, and he was never seen again in F1. He later won the Le Mans 24h a second time in 2009, with Marc Gene and Geoff Brabham.

Three rejects also died on this day.

Billy Garrett died on this day 12 years ago. Born on April 24th 1933 in Princeton, the American entered three Indy 500s from 1956 to 1958, qualifying in 1956 and 1958. In 1958, he retired with gearbox problems, but managed 16th in 1956 in his Kuzma. Garrett died in West Allis aged 65.

Ray Knepper died on this day 11 years ago. Born on February 22nd 1920 in Belleville, he entered the 1951 Indy 500 driving for Bardahl/Fred Tomshe in the Silnes. He was unable to qualify. Knepper died in Lebanon, aged 79.

Luigi Taramazzo died on this day 7 years ago. Born on May 5th 1932 in Ceva, the Italian's racing career is limited to a one-off entry in the 1958 Monaco GP for Ken Kavanagh. He couldn't qualify the Maserati. Taramazzo died in Vallecrossia, aged 71.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 17 Feb 2011, 04:37

February 16th is the birthday of three F1 drivers, two of them rejects.

Tony Crook turns 91 today, one of just nine GP starters over 90 still alive. Born in Manchester, he was one of Britain's most active post-war drivers. After dominating the local racing scene, he decided to enter the 1952 British GP in his trusty Frazer-Nash. He soon found out that a world championship race was different to everything he had encountered, and finished 21st. The next year, he entered his home race again, this time with a Cooper. After qualifying 25th yet again, he retired with fuel injections troubles. Outside of the world championship, his best results were a 5th in the 1953 United States Air Force Trophy (his only race with an Alta engine) and 4th in the 1954 Curtis Trophy. During the Goodwood 12-hour race, he slid on an oil patch and was hospitalised for two weeks. He then decided to end his career, leaving behind a total of more than 400 race starts and countless lap records in singleseaters, sportscars and hillclimbs. After his retirement, he became the owner of the Bristol Car Company.

Walt Faulkner would have turned 91. Born in Tell, he entered every Indy 500 from 1950 to 1955. Despite a DNQ in 1952, he was a respectable racer, scoring the pole in 1950 before finishing 7th. In 1951, a 14th place quali spot ended in retirement with camshaft issues. In 1953, he could only manage 17th. The next year, things picked up, and Walt hauled his Kuzma into 12th. In 1955, he went further. Qualifying 7th, he shared the car with Bill Homeier to 5th place, both receiving a point. However, things would then take a turn for the worse. On April 22nd 1956, Walt was testing his car at Vellaso when he hit a bump, sending his car into a series of flips. Walt's seatbelt failed, and he got partially ejected from the car, which rolled on top of him. Faulkner was 36.

Jean Behra would have turned 90. Born in Nice, he is considered as one of the best drivers never to win a championship race. He was a factory Gordini driver from 1950 to 1954 before switching to the Maserati factory team until 1957. In 1958, he had a one-off for Ken Kavanagh in Argentina before signing with BRM for the rest of the season. In 1959, he signed for Ferrari, but was fired after the French, having allegedly punched the team manager, Forghieri, in the face. For the German GP, he entered his own car, the Behra-Porsche. However, he never raced. While leading a supporting sportscar race on August 1st 1959, he lost control at the banked Nordkehre, the most feared corner of the AVUS track. He slid up the banking, his car colliding with a nearby building. Behra was thrown from the car and died instantly after striking a flagpole. Jean was 38. His career had given him two second places and seven thirds, and he never finished below tenth position. He scored 51.14 points and led 107 laps. Still, that win eluded him. His best championship result came in 1956, where he managed 4th position.

One reject also died on this day.

Russ Klar died six years ago. Born on April 27th 1914 in Brooklyn, the American entered just one Indy 500 in 1955. The Ray Brady-entered Schroeder never stood a chance to qualify properly. Klar died in Lynbrook, aged 90.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 19 Feb 2011, 02:46

February 18th is the birthday of two F1 rejects.

Ingo Hoffmann turns 58. Born in Sao Paulo, he was Copersucar-Fittipaldi's first ever second driver. Making his debut in 1976, he only startde one race out of six entries (there were also three DNQs and two DNSs). His only start resulted in an 11th place finish. In 1977, he was entered in Argentina and Brazil. After qualifying in 19th both times, he retired in Argentina before managing 7th in his last entry. After Formula 1, Hoffman returned to Brazil, and promptly won his national Stock Car championship 12 times.

Giovanni Lavaggi turns 53 today. born in Augusta, the Italian is the epitomy of the term "pay-driver". He first got into F1 in 1995, aged 37, driving four races of the season for the Pacific team. After qualifying last everytime except for Belgium (where he outqualified Pedro Diniz), he retired every time. The next year, he stil managed to get himself a drive as mid-season replacement, taking over Giancarlo Fisichella's role at Minardo from the German GP onwards. After three DNQs in six attempts, Giovanni finished just once, and was classified twice. He came 15th in Portugal, and was classified in 10th in hungary, despite spinning out. After Formula 1, he returned to sports cars, taking two victories. He currently runs his own racing team in GT racing.

Two rejects also died on this day.

Renato Balestrero died on this day 63 years ago. Born on July 27th 1898, the Italian entered just one non-championship race: the 1947 Bari GP. In his Alfa Romeo 8C2300, the 49-year-old managed to snatch third place. He died aged 49.

Sheila Darbyshire died exactly 32 years ago. Born on July 30th 1909 in Belfast, the lady-driver entered just two non-championship races: the British Empire Trophy in 1947 and 1948. In 1948, she had to withdraw, but she still managed 8th in 1947, driving her privately-entered Riley. Sheila Darbyshire died in Gloucestershire, aged 69.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 19 Feb 2011, 19:00

February 19th is the birthday of 4 F1 rejects.

Erik Lundgren would have turned 92. Born in Ockelbro, the Swede was mainly known on the Scandinavian racing scene. He attempted to enter the 1951 German GP in his own EL Special, a heavily modified Ford road car. However, he couldn't afford the trip to the Nurburgring and that was the end of Lundgren's F1 career. After a few more years racing in Scandinavia, he retired to concentrate on business. Erik died on September 16th 1967 in Gavle, aged 48.

Ernie McCoy would have turned 90 today. Born in Reading, the American driver entered three Indy 500s from 1953 to 1955. He actually saved the best for first, as his last entry resulted in a DNQ, his second yielded 16th and his first ever start ended with an 8th place finish in the Stevens. Ernie died on February 4th 2001 in Port Orange, aged 79.

Giulio Cabianca would have turned 88 today. Born in Verone, he entered four championship GPs. His debut didn't go as planned, failing to qualify his factory OSCA for the 1958 Monaco GP. That same year in Italy, he started his first race in a Maserati entered by Jo Bonnier. In 1959, he drove his only race that year for Scuderia Ugolini in Italy, hauling his Maserati to 15th place. 1960 saw his best result come in Italy, driving his own Cooper. Giulio finished 4th. On June 15th 1961, Cabianca was testing his Cooper at Modena, when his throttle jammed open on a straight. To avoid the wall, Giulio aimed for an opening on the side of the track, leading onto a small road. Cabianca then struck a passing taxi, killing himself and the cab's three occupants. He was 38.

Stephen South turns 59 today. An F2 driver, he impressed the McLaren team during a Lotus test in the winter of 1979. When Alain Prost was injured at the start of the 1980 season, McLaren called on south to replace him. However, South underperformed, failing to qualify. He then returned to F2 for Toleman, but was promptly sacked for joining McLaren without the team's consent. After this disappointment, Stephen began driving in Can-Am. However, a vicious crash in a Lola left him seriously injured, and his career was ended when part of his left leg had to be amputated.

Two rejects also died today.

Geoff Ansell died 60 years ago. Born on April 14th 1919, he entered 10 non-championship races, always in his ERA B-Type. He was a regular midfield runner, managing a glorious victory in the 1948 British Empire Trophy. He died aged 31.

Antonio Creus died on this day 15 years ago. Born on February 28th 1919 in Madrid, he entered only one championship race, the 1960 Argentine GP. After qualifying his Maserati in 22nd, he retired due to physical exhaustion. He also retired in his two non-championship GPs. Creus died in Madrid, aged 76.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 20 Feb 2011, 19:15

February 20th is the birthday of two F1 rejects, bot with big names.

Bobby Unser turns 77 today. Born in Colorado Springs, the American entered a total of three championship races in 1968, in a factory BRM. His first entry was for the Italian GP. However, he and Mario Andretti were prevented from starting the race, because they had driven another race less than 48 hours prior to the Grand Prix. He returned in Canada, but once again had to withdraw, as he was taking part in another race. He made his only start in his home race, starting 19th, he retired with engine problems. He won three Indy 500s, in 1968, 1975 and 1981, and won the USAC title in 1968. He officially retired in 1990, but still takes part in some historical races.

Roger Penske turns 74. Born in Shaker Heights, the well-known team owner was also a driver, who entered his home GP in 1961 and 1962. In 1961, he managed to finish in 8th position, and also hauled his Lotus to 9th place the next year. The next few years, he continued to race in USAC and sportscars, before announcing his surprise retirement in 1965, aged just 28. He then turned to team ownership, and we all know how that turned out. To this day, Penske has over 200 victories in IndyCar, NASCAR, CanAm and F1.

One F1 reject died on this day.

Lex Davison died 46 years ago. Born on February 12th 1923 in Australia, he entered two non-championship GPs: the British Empire Trophy and the Guard's Trophy, both in 1961. In the British Empire Trophy, he retired, but managed 6th in the Guard's Trophy. Davison died aged 42.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 25 Feb 2011, 02:55

A visit from a foreign exchange student and an unfortunate mishap while writing Lauda's entry meant I couldn't do this the last three days.

February 21st
Births
Roger Laurent
Peter Gethin

February 22nd
Births
George Constantine
Ray Knepper
Jesus Iglesias
Tim Mayer
Jorge de Bagration
Niki Lauda

February 23rd
Births
Hans Herrmann
Alberto Colombo
Satoru Nakajima

Deaths
Arthur Legat
Marvin Burke
Sergio Mantovani
Paul Frere

February 24th is the birthday of six F1 drivers, four of them rejects.

Kenneth Bear would have turned 105. The Briton entered two non-championship races in a private Bugatti: the 1948 Zandvoort GP, where he finished 9th, and the 1949 Jersey Road Race. While practicing for the Jersey race on April 27th 1949, his Bugatti left the road. Bear was 43.

Lance Reventlow would have turned 75. Born in London, but racing under the American nationality, he was the sole child of Barbara Hutton, heiress to the fortune of Frank Woolworth, owner of the famous stores, who then married Cary Grant, the actor. He is also known for being one of the last people to see James Dean alive before his fatal road accident. It was thanks to his many connections that he got into racing in 1955, aged 19. After some success at home, he decided to found his own racing team to race in F1: the Scarab. However, the front-engined machine was outdated for 1960, and he didn't quilify the car in Monaco. He opted out of the Dutch GP after a starting money dispute, but made his only start later on in Belgium. Qualifying 15th, he retired after just one lap with engine problems. For the British GP, he switched to Rob Walker Racing, but he had to relinquish his car to teammate at Scarab and Robe Walker, Chuck Daigh. After this unsuccessful campaign, he returned to America, where, after another attempt at building his own car, he retired from all types of racing. On July 24th 1972, Lance was a passenger on a Cessna driven by an inexperienced 27-year-old student pilot, while observing an area for the planned construction of a ski resort in the Rocky Mountains, when the pilot entered a blind canyon and stalled the plane while turning around. The plane plunged to the ground. Reventlow was 36.

Francois Mazet turns 68. The Parisian driver had a short F1 career. After a few seasons in F3 and F2, he entered the 1971 French GP for Jo Siffert, finishing 13th. He was also due to drive in Italy, but had to withdraw. After a few drives in the ETCC in the 1980's he retired from racing.

Alain Prost turns 56. Born in Lorette, the Frenchman is the third most successful driver of all-time, behind Schumacher and Fangio. After a meteoric rise through the racing ranks, he signed for McLaren in 1980, after refusing a drive in F2. After a good first season, scoring five points in the troublesome McLaren (the low point being his injury in practice for the South African GP, missing the next round), he signed for Renault creating a completely French team after Jabouille's departure. Three wins and three other podiums made for a very good campaign, finshing fifth. In 1982, he won the first two races, and then scored two more second places, scoring 34 points and taking 4th in the championship. 1983 was even better. With four wins and three other podiums, he missed out on the title by two points to Nelson Piquet. The next year, he got even closer. After returning to McLaren, Alain took seven wins, but eventually lost the title to his teammate Lauda, more consistent, by just half a point. 1985 was the year everything fell into place. After taking five wins, he romped to the crown by 20 points over Alboreto. In 1986, he took four wins in a car vastly inferior to the Williams. However, the Williams drivers taking points off each other, Prost took the title in Australia after Mansell's tire blow-up. In 1987, Prost took three wins and 4th place. The next year, Ayrton Senna was signed as McLaren's second driver alondside Alain. However, the two never bonded, and, despite taking seven wins and more points than Senna, Prst lost the title thanks to the rule stipulating the fact that only your 11 best results counted. After four wins and six second places, he won the title for the third time after a controversial incident with Senna in Suzuka. When Senna attempted to overtake Prost at the Casio Triangle, Prost blocked Ayrton, and both drivers went straight ahead. Prost immediatley got out of the car, his suspension broken, but Senna continued, after being pushed by the marshalls and cutting the chicane. His eventual disqualification gave the race win to Alessandro Nannini, and the title to Prost. 1990 was payback time for Prost, after being fired by Ron Dennis. Prost gladly signed for Ferrari, alongside Mansell. After taking five wins, Prost lost the title in another controversial incident at Suzuka. Despite taking the pole, Senna wasn't allowed to choose where the poleman started the race, and the FIA made him start on the dirty side of the track, the first time this happened at Suzuka. Prost got the better start, and Senna (intentionally) nerfed him off at the first corner. In 1991, the Ferrari was substantially subpar, and Prsost eventually left the team after stating the Ferrari "handled like a truck". After a sabbatical in 1992, he returned for Williams in 1993. alongside Damon Hill. After 7 victories, 12 podiums, just one retirement and 99 points. Prost finally retired in 1993 after 199 starts, 4 titles, 51 wins, 33 poles, 41 fastest laps, 106 podiums and 798.5 points. He can now be found winning once more in the Andros Trophy.

Emmanuele Naspetti turns 43. Born in Ancona, the Italian spent a lot of time in go-karts, before graduating to F3 in 1987 and F3000 in 1989. After a good 1991 season, taking four wins and third in the championship, Naspetti led the 1992 race when Paul Belmondo was fired from the March F1 team for insufficient results. Naspetti was called up to take his place. Emmanuele was able to keep up with Wendlinger most of the time, but only managed 11th as best result in 5 races. However, he wasn't signed full-time the next season. After becoming test driver for Jordan in 1993, he was hired to drive in Portugal as a than-you gift, but retired from the race, and from F1. This is where Naspetti's career takes off. Converting to Italian Touring Cars, his best period comes from 1996 to 1999, coming second thrice and winning the crown in 1997, with 10 wins and 18 podiums out of 20 rounds. After switching to European Touring Cars and GTs, he retired from racing.

Pedro de la Rosa turns 40. After a tumultuous rise through the junior ranks, the Spaniard from Barcelona made his F1 debut for Arrows in 1999 aged 28. A disappointing season saw his sole top ten - sixth in Australia - as high point. After scoring the one point in 1999, he went one better in 2000, taking two points in Europe and Germany. He then - yep, you guessed it - scored three points in 2001, this time for Jaguar, with 6th in Canada and 5th in Italy. 2002, however, was disappointing, with de la Rosa scoring no points at all, two eighth places being his best results. After signing with McLaren as test driver, he was called on when Montoya got his "tennis injury", taking fifth and the fastest lap in Bahrain. After the same Montoya left McLaren after the US GP in 2006, de la Rosa was once again called up for the rest of the season, taking a total of 19 points, and even second place in the unpredictable Hungarian GP. Continuing as McLaren tester, he was signed full-time by Sauber for the 2010 season. However, an extremely disappointing start to the season saw him score no points until Hungary, taking 7th. By then, however, it was too late, and de la Rosa was fired after the Italian GP.

A profiled reject also died on this day.

Clemente Biondetti died 56 years ago. Born on August 18th 1898 in Burdusso, the Italian had a successful career, but only in domestic racing. After several non-championship races, Biondetti entered the 1950 Monaco GP for Scuderia Milano, but the car was eventually unavailable. Later on that year, Clemente took his Ferrari-Jaguar road-car-race-car hybrid to the track in Monza for the Italian GP. However, he retired with engine problems after qualifying 25th. After this brief stay in F1, he returned to F2 and sportscars. However, he was struck by cancer in 1955, and succumbed to the disease that same year in Florence, aged 56.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby Bleu » 25 Feb 2011, 07:02

February 24, 1955 is a rare day as there has been birth and death of F1 driver on same day.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 26 Feb 2011, 02:40

February 25th is the birthday of three F1 drivers, one of them reject, the other two legends.

Chuck Leighton would have turned 87. Born in Los Angeles, he entered just the 1950 Indy 500 in the factory Cantarano, the only time the car would enter a race. The Wayne-powered car never stood a chance of making the cut. Leighton died on 8th June 2003, aged 79.

Tony Brooks turns 79. Born in Dukinfield, Brooks was first of all a dentist who just happened to race cars on Sunday. And what a bloody quick dentist he was! His first taste of F1 came in 1956, driving for BRM. After three non-starts, he finally started the British GP, but a stuck throttle saw him ejected from the car and break his leg. After a speedy recovery, he was signed for two years by Vanwall alongside Stirling Moss. After coming second in Monaco, he shared the car with Moss to victory in the British GP. However, those were his only finishes in his five-race campaign. He came back strong in 1958, taking three wins in Belgium, Germany and Italy, and third in the championship. In 1959, he joined Ferrari. With two wins in France and Germany and two other podiums, he managed second in the championship. Things went downhill from there. In 1960, he signed for one of the first sponsored racing teams, the Yeoman Credit Racing team, with whom he still took seven points. In 1961, he signed for BRM again. However, the car was somewhat underwhelming, and he scored just six points, including a wonderful third in his final F1 race in the United States. He still owns his little garage, and occasionally takes part in historical races.

Francois Cevert would have turned 67. Born in Paris, he took part in many types of racing at the same time, but is better known for his untimely death. After winning the French F3 and European F2 titles, he made his F1 debut for Tyrrell in 1970. Sadly, the car was subpar, and Cevert took just one point, in Italy. Things went better in 1971. After taking three podiums, he finally succeeded in taking a GP victory at Watkins Glen, putting and end to the 13-year drought for France. However, 1972 wasn't as successful. Frustrated by the lack of reliability, Cevert also made some mistakes of his own, but still managed two second places and a fourth to notch up 15 points. In 1973, the Tyrrell was once again a championship-contending car, and Cevert promptly took a total of six second places, and, apart from South Africa, finished every race in the points. Stewart having announced his retirement and the Tyrrell once again looking like a promising car, Francois was naturally chosen as first driver. However, things took a turn for the disastrous. On a qualifying lap for the season-ending race at Watkins Glen, Cevert entered the Esses in third gear, against Stewart's advice, who preferred to start the corner in fourth, at low revs. Cevert hit the curbing and the car was pitched into the barriers, before bouncing head-on into the opposite barriers on two wheels. In a freak series of events, the Tyrrell was cut in half, and poor Cevert with it. He was just 29.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 26 Feb 2011, 22:19

February 26th is the birthday of three F1 rejects.

Jean-Pierre Wimille would have turned 103. Born in Paris, he was a pre-war racing star, and is also known for forming part of the French resistance during WW2. After the war, he resumed his awesomeness, taking eight victories in F1 races, before being killed in an accident during practice for a Temporada race in Buenos Aires on January 28th 1949. He swerved off the track, and the car rolled several times before landing upside down. Wimille was 40.

Robert la Caze turns 94. Born in Paris as well, he emigrated to Morocco, and became a racing legend in Northern Africa. After sporadic European racing, he was invited as a F2 field-filler for the Morocco GP in 1958. After a quiet race, he finished 2nd of the F2 drivers.

Rupert Keegan turns 56. Born in Westcliff-on-Sea, he had a habit of driving naughtily sponsored cars early in his career. After pulling some strings, he first entered F1 in 1977, for Penthouse Rizla Hesketh. However, he only managed a sole 7th in Austria as best result. The next year, he drove for Durex team Surtees. However, the car was atrocious, and he only qualified seven times, starting a total of six times. He was unable to find a drive for 1979 with his results. He returned in 1980 for RAM, still sponsored by Penthouse Rizla. Rupert qualified four times out of seven, managing to finish 9th in Watkins Glen. His F1 career, however, was over, and after five more attempts for March in 1982, he retired from F1. He then turned to sportscars and CART, more success coming in the former, and retired in 1986 to concentrate on business. He made a surprise return, however, for the 1995 Le Mans 24h.

Five rejects also died on this day.

Milt Fankhauser died 41 years ago. Born on October 29th 1915 in New York, Milt entered just one Indy 500, in 1950. He couldn't qualify the Stevens. He died in Santa Barbara, aged 54.

Russ Congdon died 13 years ago. Born on September 28th 1927 in Puyallup (no typo), he entered just one Indy 500, in 1960. His Kurtis Kraft was unable to qualify. He died in Puyallup, aged 70.

Johnny Fedricks died 10 years ago. Born on April 27th 1925 in Royal Oak, he attempted to make the Indy 500 four times: in 1950, 1952, 1953 and 1957. He never managed to qualify once. He died in Oakland, aged 75.

Duke Nalon also died 10 years ago. Born on March 12th 1913 in chicago, he entered every Indy 500 from 1950 to 1954 for the Novi works team, in Kurtis Krafts. He qualified in 1951, 1952 and 1953, retiring eevery single time. 1951 was undoubtedly his best Indy 500. After taking pole, he retired, but as you were still classified even when you retired, Duke was classified 10th. He died in Indianapolis aged 87.

Christian Goethals died 8 years ago. The Belgian, born on August 4th 1928 in Heule, was a sportscar driver throughout his career. In 1958, he bought a Cooper F2 car, and entered sporadic events that year, including the German GP as F2 field-filler. In 1961, after a crash in Angola, he retired from racing. He died in Kortrijk, aged 74.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 27 Feb 2011, 18:42

February 27th is the birthday of 3 F1 drivers.

Ebb Rose would have turned 86. Born in Houston, his F1 career is limited to a DNQ at the 1960 Indy 500. His John Zink-entered Moore wasn't fast enough to qualify. He died on August 27th 2007 in Harris, aged 82.

Peter Revson would have turned 72. Born in New York, he just happened to be an extremely talented driver with heaps of cash in reserve, as he was heir of the Revlon cosmetics empire. Anyway, impressive performances in junior categories saw him signed by Reg Parnell for a handful of races in 1964. Underwhelming results saw him get tired of F1, and he quickly turned to sportscars. Great results saw him signed as a one-off deal for Tyrrell for the 1971 USGP, 7 years after his last F1 start. He retired after his clutch failed, but was still signed by McLaren for 1972. He quickly began to pile on the podiums, scoring four in total, and even his and McLaren's first pole at Mosport to finish 5th in the title chase! The next year, he scored just as many podiums, but two of those, however, were victories, in Great Britain and Canada. Despite once again scoring fifth in the championship, he left McLaren to go to Shadow. After retiring from the first two races, Revson went to Kyalami for a test session before the first race.Approaching Barbeque Bend, a suspension bolt failed and pitched Revson into the barrier at 220 km/h. The car instantly caught fire in the massive impact. Revson was 35.

Pedro Chaves turns 46. Born in Porto, he was portugal's brightest hope in F1 for a few years. After a mediocre rise through the ranks, things went much better when he lost 10kg on his way to the British F3000 title. After a handful of races in International F3000, he made the step up to F1, as a paid-driver, not a pay-driver. However, the Coloni was ugly, slow and heavy, and Chaves' season was even worse than expected. He never managed to even get close to prequalifying. After being paid ten times less than the contract stipulated, he left the team. After turning to GTs and Indy Lights, he turned to rallying, where he still competes to this day.

Two drivers also died on this day.

Bobby Ball died 57 years ago. Born on August 26th 1925 in Phoenix, he entered the Indy 500 in 1951 and 1952, qualifying both times. In 1951, he finished 5th, but retired early on in 1952 with gearbox problems. On January 4th 1953, Ball was taking part in the first race of the AAA season in California, when he tangled with Andy Linden coming into turn 1. Both cars flipped, and Johnny Tolan followed suit. Tolan was unharmed, Linden had a broken shoulder, but Ball had suffered critical head injuries. After spending 14 months in a coma, Bobby Ball died at the hospital in Phoenix from a basal skull fracture, having never regained consciousness. He was 28.

Ettore Chimeri died 51 years ago. Born in Ladi on June 4th 1921, Italy, he had the Venezuelan nationality, and was his country's first driver. After some local racing, he entered the 1959 Indy 500, but couldn't start. The next year, he entered the Argentine GP, but retired due to physical exhaustion. On February 27th 1960, he was practicing for a sportscar race in cuba, when he lost control of the Ferrari he was driving. He flew over a chain-link fence, the car rolling several times. Ettore was 38.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby Aerospeed » 28 Feb 2011, 03:48

Happy birthday Pedro! The ultimate reject of F1
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby Bleu » 28 Feb 2011, 18:53

Today, two rejects celebrating.

Ingo Hoffmann turns 58 today. He participated three South American (Brazil twice, Argentina once) Grand Prix's in 1970s. However, he is best known as Brazilian stock car legend, having won Stock Car Brazil title no less than 12 times.

Sébastien Bourdais turns 32. He won International F3000 title in 2002, and moved to Champ Cars where he won four straight titles in 2004-07. He then moved to F1 with Toro Rosso. He finished 7th twice in his first season and 8th twice in his second season, before being dropped between German and Hungarian GPs.

Among with rejects, it's Mario Andretti's birthday. He turns 71. One of the most versatile racing drivers ever, he was 1978 Formula One World Champion, 1967 Daytona 500 winner, 1969 Indianapolis 500 winner and four-time IndyCar champion.

Two now late rejects were also born on this day:

* Albert Scherrer, born 1908. Swiss driver participated his home race in 1953, finishing 9th. He passed away in July 1986.
* Antonio Creus, born 1919. Spanish driver started one race, Argentina 1960 where he retired due to exhaustion. Creus died in February 1996.

And one non-reject too
* Elie Bayol, born 1914. Drove seven Grand Prix's, finished 5th in Argentina 1954 and 6th in Monaco 1956. Passed away in May 1995,

Two drivers died on this day:
* Timmy Mayer, just after his 26th birthday. He participated 1962 USA Grand Prix where he retired. He then drove in Tasman series and killed while practicing for eighth and final race of 1964. He had success earlier in the series with four podiums but no victory. He was fourth in final standings, but it is remarkable who were drivers ahead of him: Bruce McLaren, Jack Brabham and Denny Hulme! Timmy Mayer's brother Teddy was McLaren team boss in 1970s.
* Charles Pozzi, born in 1909 and died in 2001. Drove his home race in 1950 finishing 6th.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 28 Feb 2011, 22:13

Well, now Bleu's done it, that's some pressure off my back for today.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby dinizintheoven » 28 Feb 2011, 23:48

Waaaaaaaaaaaait a minute... tommykl, why are you classifying Jean-Pierre Wimille, Kenneth Bear, Franco Cortese and Chas Mortimer (to name four) as rejects? Bear and JPW were both killed in the late 1940s, so they competed in races to Formula 1 regulations but which could not be for World Championship points because the championship didn't exist; Cortese and Mortimer competed in the early 1950s but only in non-championship races. So should any of these be considered as rejects? If we're taking it on placings, despite the non-championship nature of the races, then surely Cortese (two 5ths, 4th, and an unspecified podium) and Wimille (eight wins!) have well and truly unrejectified themselves.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 01 Mar 2011, 02:57

Yeah, sorry. I just counted them as rejects because, technically, they are, having never taken part in a championship race. Anyway, I still write about them because that's how I really get a feel about their achievements...if that sentence made any sense...
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 02 Mar 2011, 00:48

March 1st is the birthday of a true reject.

Leroy Warriner would have turned 92. Born in Indianapolis, the American entered 5 Indy 500s. He is a true reject in that he never qualified for any of them. Despite being entered in very competitve cars (Kurtis Krafts) by fairly competitive owners, he couldn't qualify in 1951, 1953, 1955, 1956 or 1958. He died on January 2nd 2003 in Indianapolis of a heart attack, aged 83.

However, six drivers died on this day.

Alexander Orley died 40 years ago. The American, born in December 23rd 1911, entered four non-championship races in France and Germany. In 1948 and 1949, he entered the Grand Prix du Salon, first in his Todd (his real surname) Special, then in a Veritas Meteor. He never finished any of them. Then, with Formula One running to F2 regulations in 1952, he entered two de facto F1 races, the ADAC Eifelrennen and the Avusrennen, in his Orley Special. He had to withdraw from the first of them, but managed to start the second. However, he was painfully slow, and wasn't classified at the finish. He died approximately on March 1st 1971, aged 59.

Peter Walker died 27 years ago. Born on October 7th 1912 in Leeds, he is better known as being a driver in the firs ever World Championship race, and for winning the 1951 Le Mans 24h. In the 1950 British GP, in an ERA, he qualified 10th, but only drove two laps before handing the car to Tony Rolt, who drove a further three laps before retiring. He returned in 1951, tking a good 7th place in the factory BRM. He came back once more in 1955, in a Stirling Moss-entered Maserati for the Dutch GP, retiring with wheel problems after qualifying in 10th once more. He took his last F1 start in the British GP that same year, retiring with throttle failure. He died in Newtown of a pneumonia, aged 71.

Wolfgang Seidel died 24 years ago. Born on July 4th 1926 in Dusseldorf, he drove on-and-off in F1 from 1953 to 1962. He made his first start in 1953 for the German GP in a Veritas, where he finished 16th. His next entry came 5 years later, in 1958, in Belgium and Morocco for Scuderia Centro Sud. Qualifying near the back, he retired both times. In 1959, he entered the Monaco GP for Scuderia Colonia, but the car was unavailable, and Seidel couldn't start he returned the next year in Italy, driving a private Cooper. Qualifying 13th, he finished a career best 9th. In 1961, Wolfgang had his largest F1 program since the start of his career, entering 4 races for Scuderia Colonia. However, he didn't pay the entry fee in Belgium, so couldn't start. In the other three rounds, he could only finish 17th in Great Britain. 1962 was his last F1 season, driving out of his own pocket this time. After a one-off for Ecurie Maarsbergen in Holland (he wasn't classified at the finish), he retired in Great Britain, then hit a new low, as he was unable to qualify for his home race. He died in Munich, aged 60.

Jackie Holmes died 16 years ago. Born on September 4th 1920 in Indianapolis, he entered 4 Indy 500s from 1950 to 1953. Entering 4 times in 4 different cars, he only qualified in 1950, in the Olson, and 1953, in the Kurtis Kraft. However, Holmes retired both times. In 1950, he spun out, and in 1953 an oil leak ended his race. He died in Indianapolis, aged 74.

Ian Connell died 8 years ago. Born on October 15th 1913, the Brit enetered 6 non-championship races in 1946 and 1947. In 46, he entered the Grand Prix des Frontieres, but he couldn't qualify. Out of five races in 1947, he retired thrice and finished 7th in the other races. He died aged 89.

Lee Drollinger died 5 years ago. Born on May 20th 1927 in Champaign, he entered the 1960 Indy 500 for Ray Brady. He couldn't qualify the Kurtis Kraft. He died in Mahomet aged 78.

Four GPs were raced on this day, all of them in South Africa (1969, 1975, 1980, 1992).
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 03 Mar 2011, 03:39

Only one event in F1 today, and what an event.

Gabriele Tarquini turns 49. Born in Giulianova, he destroyed all comers in karting, before a midfield career in F3000 saw him score his first F1 drive: a one-off for Osella at the 1987 San Marino GP. After qualifying in last, he retired on lap 26. He then signed full-time for Coloni in 1988. After qualifying for the first five races of the season, finishing 8th in Canada, he DNPQ'd 6 times over the season, also scoring 2 DNQs. He then drove for AGS in 1989, qualifying for the first six races, managing 8th in San Marino, 7th in the USA and even 6th in Mexico for his only career point! However, he DNQ'd in Great Britain and then DNPQ'd every other weekend. In 1990, still for AGS, he scored 7 more DNPQs and 5 DNQs, only finishing once, with 13th in Hungary. Still for AGS, things didn't change for 1991. After three DNPQs and 7 DNQs, he decided enough was enough, and signed for Fondmetal for the last three rounds. Qualifying in Spain and Japan, finishing 14th and 12th respectively, he DNPQ'd once more, for the 25th time in his career. In 1992, the Fondmetal was mildly competitive, but awfully unreliable. Qualifying for every race, even qualifying 11th in Belgium, he retired all but once in 13 attempts. He managed 14th at Silverstone, before the team went bankrupt. After this, he returned for one last time as replacement for the injured Ukyo Katayama for Tyrrell, at the 1995 European GP, finishing 14th. After F1, he converted to tin-tops, and won the BTCC in 1994, the ETCC in 2003 and the WTCC in 2009 (becoming the oldest ever FIA World Champion).
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby dinizintheoven » 03 Mar 2011, 12:25

tommykl wrote:Only one event in F1 today, and what an event. Gabriele Tarquini turns 49...

...and what you'll never find mentioned anywhere, so it seems, is his role as chief test driver for Maserati. (See also: Andrea Montermini for Pagani, PHR for Bugatti... not bad jobs for F1 rejects, are they?) Remembering that I'd seen him on Top Gear once, I tracked down the episode... and here it is. (Get it before it's removed!) The relevant segment starts at 3:19, the bit with Tarquini in it starts at 7:59.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby eytl » 03 Mar 2011, 23:50

Well well well ...

3 March is not only the birthday of Nicolas Kiesa (remember him?), but that pales into insignificance compared to this earth-shattering milestone:

Happy 50th birthday to the one, the only, the great Perry McCarthy!!!
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby dinizintheoven » 04 Mar 2011, 01:07

Definitely worth celebrating. In fact, I'm off to Sainsbury's to get a cake!

And of all the drivers I ever watched in the last 21 years, when the "forgettable drivers" thread came up, Nicolas Kiesa was the only one I genuinely forgot about.
James Allen, on his favourite F1 engine of all time:
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 04 Mar 2011, 03:09

Apart from those two rejects (of whom I'll also give a brief career description), two other drivers, one of which is a reject, the other never took part in a championship race (happy now, dinizintheoven???).

Robert Gerbout would have turned 105. Virtually nothing is known about this driver. Noone knows where he was born or where and when he died. The Frenchman, mainly an F2 and sportscar driver, entered one F2 race when F1 was run to F2 regulations: the 1952 Cadours GP, in his own Lombard. He did not qualify.

Otto Stuppacher would have turned 64. Born in Vienna, he started racing in hillclimbs, where he was hugely successful, beating a certain Niki Lauda to the national title in 1971, and sportscars, where he was decidedly less successful. After announcing his retirement in 1972, he returned three years later in sportscars, without any success. In 1976, the organizers of the Austrian GP hosted a young drivers race, where the top 2 would earn enough money to be able to sign up for the actual F1 race. However, Stuppacher and Karl Oppitzhauser, the top two, were refused entry. Stuppacher started a petition amongst other drivers, but due to being relatively unknown, he couldn't get in. Later, with the OSAC providing financial support, he rented an old Tyrrell 007 for three races towards the end of the 1976 season. In Italy, he qualified 14 seconds off the pole, and did not qualify. After qualifying, however, three other drivers were stripped of their best times, and Otto found himself on the grid. He couldn't start the race, however, as he had already returned home. In Canada and the United States, he didn't qualify either in the Tyrrell, with a car bearing the "Austria is beautiful" slogan, finishing 13 and a mammoth 28 seconds off pole. He immediately retired from motorsports. He dropped off the radar completely, and was only heard from again when he was found dead in his Vienna apartment on August 13th 2001. Otto was 54.

Perry McCarthy turns 50. Born in Stepney, his rise through the ranks was slow, to say the least. British Formula Ford champion in 1983, he spent three years in F3 and two years in F3000 before moving to endurance racing. After winning a good deal of money, he got the second driver seat at the Andrea Moda F1 team for 1992. However, at the San Marino GP, he was refused entry because his Superlicense was revoked by Bernie. After appeal, Perry finally managed to "properly" drive an F1 car. However, things didn't exactly go according to plan. In 10 entries, he couldn't drive three times, and only actually set a time thrice, auring the owrst conditions possible. He was mistreated by the team, who sent him out in Belgium with a very faulty direction, almost killing Perry. After the team was refused entry for the Italian GP, McCarthy's career was done, and he returned to sportscars, where he still drives to this day. He is better known for being Top Gear's first Stig, and even better for the way he was fired from the show: announcing the best-kept secret in the world of TV in his autobiography: "Flat-out, flat broke: F1 the hard way".

Niolas Kiesa turns 33. Born in Copenhagen, he won coutless titles in karting, and was British and European FFord champion in 1999. After mediocre seasons in F3, he moved up to F3000, taking a few minor points positions. In 2003, he signed for a Danish team: Den Blå Avis. His season was mildly successful, but the high point was a victory at Monaco, obtained under hilarious circumstances: the leader, Bjorn Wirdheim, slowed down on the last lap to wave to his mechanics, but slowed before the finish line, allowing Kiesa to storm to victory. In late 2003, Nicolas got the chance of his life. Justin Wilson having left the Minardi team to drive for Jaguar, Kiesa was signed as second driver for five rounds. Despite finishing every race, he was very underwhelming, only managing a sole 11th place under the rain at Indy as best result. Unsurprisingly, he wasn't signed up for 2004. He now drives sporadically in Touring Cars and Sports cars.

Two rejects also died on this day.

Ernst Loof died 55 years ago. Born in Neindorf on July 4th 1907, he was first a motorcycle legend, taking the German championship 8 times in 9 years, and was mainly known as the designer of the Veritas cars. However, he also drove one world championship race when it was run to F2 rules: the 1953 German GP - in a Veritas of course - where he retired with fuel pump problems after qualifying 21st. He died in Bonn from a long and painful cancer. Ernst was 48.

Lella Lombardi died 19 years ago. Born on March 26th 1941 in Frugarolo, Lomardi is the only female driver to score points in an F1 race. Her F1 career started in 1974, entering the British GP in a private Brabham. Despite not qualifying, she currently still holds the record for the highest number of a car that competed in qualifying, 208. She returned in 1975, running a full program for March. Despite an overall disappointing year, she managed 7th at the Nurburgring, and even 6th at the red-flagged Spanish GP, earning half a point! for the last race at Watkins Glen, she drove a one-off for Williams, but she was unable to take part in qualifying proper. In 1976, she drove for March in Brazil, but a 14th place saw Lella get fired. She then drove her last four F1 races for the RAM team, only managing 12th in Austria. After continuing to race in sportscars, taking three victories, she died a few days before her 51st birthday in Milan from cancer.

The 1973 and 1979 South African GPs took place on this day, as well as the 2002 Australian GP.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby dinizintheoven » 04 Mar 2011, 04:40

tommykl wrote:Otto Stuppacher would have turned 64. ... In Canada and the United States, he didn't qualify either in the Tyrrell, with a car bearing the "Austria is beautiful" slogan, finishing 13 and a mammoth 28 seconds off pole. He immediately retired from motorsports.

Life Racing Engines, Mastercard Lola, Subaru-powered Coloni, can you hear me, your "records" had already taken one hell of a beating!
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 05 Mar 2011, 04:34

March 4th is the birthday of five F1 drivers.

Carl Forberg would have turned 100. Born in Omaha, he entered the first three Indy 500s in the F1 era. However, he only qualified in 1951, eventually finishing the race in 7th. He died on January 17th in Brownsburg, aged 88.

Nino Vaccarella turns 78. Born in Palermo, he entered his first world championship race in Italy, in 1961. The Scuderia Serenissima De Tomaso (and the only race for the Conrero engine, effectively a rebadged Alfa Romeo) couldn't finish the race. He returned the next year for three races: Monaco, Germany and Italy for Scuderia Venezia. He DNQ'd in Monaco with the Lotus before switching to a Porsche for the Nurburgring, finishing 15th. In Italy, he reverted to the Lotus, and finished in 9th. His next and last F1 start came for the 1965 Italian GP, for the Ferrari factory team. However, he retired, but was still classified in 12th. After continuing to race sportscars, he returned to his old job as a lawyer, and still races in historical races.

Jim Clark would have turned 75. Born in Kilmany, he is often regarded as one of F1's best drivers of all time. His first F1 season came in 1960, driving six races for the Lotus team, for whom he would drive his entire career. THe 1960 season yielded two fifths and a third. In 1961, he took two further podiums. 1962 was his coming of age, and he took three victories to second in the championship. In 1963, he took seven wins on his way to the crown. 1964 was somewhat worse, but he still managed three wins and third in the championship. 1965 was once again a great year, Clark taking six wins and the title. 1966 was decidedly worse, as the Lotus was incredibly unreliable. Clark still managed one win and sixth in the championship. In 1967, he took four wins, but again, bad reliability saw him lose the championship to the more consistent Hulme. In 1968, he started the year well, with a win in South Africa, but he made the decision to enter an F2 race at Hockenheim on April 7th 1968. Inexplicably, the car careened off the circuit, disintegrating amongst the trees. Clark was 32.

Satoshi Motoyama turns 40. Born in Tokyo, he was hugely successful in Japanese F3000 and GT, scoring him a drive as Friday test driver for Jordan at the 2003 Japanese GP. After the test, there was no incentive to sign him on again, and he returned to F Nippon and JGTC.

Jos Verstappen turns 39. Born in Montfort, his rise through the ranks was quick, to say the least. He made his F1 debut in 1994 for Benetton. In his 10 races that year, he scored two podiums (in Hungary and Belgium) and a further fifth to score ten points. In 1995, he is loaned by Flavio to Simtek, where he would qualify higher than he should have. However, the car was unreliable, and he only finished once (12th in Spain) before the team went bankrupt. In 1996, Jos signed for Footwork, but he only finished four times, mainly retiring due to accidents (five times in total). He scored just one point in Argentina. The next year, he signed for Tyrrell. His season was mediocre, and he scored no points, only managing 8th in Monaco, and he was sacked in favour of Ricardo Rosset when Craig Pollock took over the team. He found a seat mid-season at Stewart in 1998, after Jan Magnussen was fired, but only managed 12th in France as best result. In 2000, after a one-year break, he signed for Arrows next to Pedro de la Rosa. His season was mixed, with three accidents and 5 points, with fourth in Italy as best result. He stayed at Arrows in 2001, but the car wasn't quick at all. He still managed to take 6th in Austria, though. In 2003, after another break, he signed for Minardi, but the car wasn't a world beater. His best result was 9th in Canada. After that disappointing season, no one signed him for 2004, and his F1 career was over. He currently races in endurance races, after a brief stay in A1GP, where he managed a win in Durban.

One F1 driver also died on this day.

Bill Aston died 37 years ago. Born on March 29th 1900 in Stafford, he is better known for being the creator of the Aston NB41. However, he was also a driver, and entered three races in 1952 counting towards the world championship. The fact he was 52 years old didn't deter him, and he managed one start, in Germany, where he retired with oil pressure troubles. He died in Lingfield, aged 73.

The 1972 and 1978 South African GPs were held on this day, as well as the 2001 Australian GP.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 06 Mar 2011, 01:08

March 5th is the birthday of two F1 rejects.

Graham McRae turns 71. Born in WEllington, the New Zealander was hugely successful in F2, F5000 and the Tasman Series, but also entered a sole F1 championship race: the 1973 British GP in Frank Williams' Iso-Marlboro. After qualifying in 28th, he retired on lap one, the only driver to do so in a reason separate to the famous accident at Woodcote corner caused by Scheckter, who ended Andrea de Adamich's racing career. McRae actually retired with a faulty throttle. After formula One, he continued racing, and was also seen in CART as late as in 1987.

Luciano Burti turns 36. Born in Sao Paulo, he was very successful in the lower series, without actually winning any open-wheel championship apart from some karting. After a good campaign in the 1998 British F3 championship, he was signed as Stewart test-driver, his first F1 drive. When the Stewart team was bought by Jaguar, he was kept on as test-driver, getting his first break at the Austrian GP that same year, where Eddie Irvine fell ill. Qualifying 21st, he eventually finished in 11th place. When Johnny Herbert retired from F1 after the 2000 season, Burti was hired as second driver for the whole season. Qualifying mostly in the midfield, he finished three of his first four races, managing 8th in Australia. However, he was fired after the San Marino GP, and was quickly signed by Prost, replacing the even more disappointing Gaston Mazzacane. He was usually he very reliable driver, retiring only twice and managing another 8th place in Canada. At Hockenheim, though, things went wrong. At the start, his Prost launched off the back of Michael Schumacher's slow-starting Ferrari, and caused a pile-up in which Luciano flipped over. He was uninjured in the accident. At the next race in hungary, he once again retired after leaving the track. In Belgium, things went even worse. While fighting for position with Irvine, he left the track at high speed, and Burti's car was trapped under the tyre barriers, ending his season. Afterwards, he was unable to find another drive. He now races in Brazilian Stock Cars, being mildly successful.

Two drivers also died on this day.

Tom Pryce died 34 years ago. Born on June 11th 1949 in Ruthin, Wales, he is mostly remembered for the tragic circumstances of his untimely death. After a normal rise through the junior ranks (marked by an accident in F3 at Monaco where he was thrown into a shop window while pushing car, breaking his leg), his first taste of F1 championship racing came in the 1974 Belgian GP for Token. He retired from the race. He was refused entry to the Monaco GP due to lack of experience. He retaliated by winning the supprting F3 race. He was signed as replacement driver for the deceased Peter Revson at Shadow, scoring his only point of the year at the Nurburgring. In 1975, the Shadow was a marked improvement, and he even managed pole at Silverstone, but retired, being the first victim of the rainstorm that hit the track at the end of the race. Apart from that, he scored 8 points and tenth in the championship, with third in the rain-hit Austrian GP. The next year, the car was again competitive sometimes, and Pryce took another podium in Brazil, as well as six more points throughout the season, taking an overall 12th place in the championship. 1977 was decidedly more difficult. The car wasn't competitive, and Pryce seemed to struggle as much as his teammate Renzo Zorzi. At the South African GP, Zorzi stopped on the track with a blown engine. A small fire declared itself on his car. Two marshalls crossed the track with fire extinguishers, just as Pryce went over the crest. He struck the second marshall, and the fire extinguisher he was carrying struck Tom in the face, wrenching his helmet off and almost decapitating the Welshman. He was 27.

Ernie de Vos died 6 years ago. Born on July 31st 1941 in Holland, the Canadian was hugely successful in F Junior in the early 1960's. This success led Peter Broeker to knock on de Vos' door, as he was looking for a second driver for the Stebro team. Ernie was then entered for the 1963 United Stated Grand Prix, but the second Stebro was never prepared. After the 1964 season, he decided to retire from motorsport at just 23 years old. He died in a road accident in Nokomis, USA, aged 63.

The 1977 South African GP was held on this day.
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby Aerospeed » 06 Mar 2011, 03:06

Hideki Noda's B-day is tommorow, he was a good driver, rejectful wise :lol:
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Trulli bad puns...
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby tommykl » 08 Mar 2011, 00:20

Alright. To tell you the truth, I'm not really motivated to keep this up. I won't have much time to do this, so I'm afraid I'll have to stop writing out full reviews. I'll write a brief weekly report, with the drivers or GPs with the dates, but that's about it.

Sorry everyone!
Third place finisher in the 1955 British Grand Prix(according to pasta_maldonado)
kevinbotz on the chat wrote:Knots...just piss me off

I am an F1 fan, snatched away by this forum. HELP ME TOM CRUISE! (until Vandoorne reaches F1)
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby Bleu » 08 Mar 2011, 03:04

Hideki Noda turns 42. Three Grand Prix's in 1994, three DNFs. Next year he was set to drive for Simtek but couldn't find the money, so he lost his drive.

Rudolf Schoeller died in 1978. Born in 1902, he participated one race, German GP 1952, and retired with suspension failure.

Three Grand Prix's held on this day: South African GP 1970, Australian GP 1999 and 2004.
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby Bleu » 08 Mar 2011, 22:10

Only reject celebrating birthday today is Michael Bartels who turns 43. Standing in for Johnny Herbert who had F3000 commitments, he tried to qualify for four races in 1991, but didn't succeed. Outside of Formula One, he won GT1 World Championship last year with Andrea Bertolini.

Bob Gregg was also born on this day, back in 1920. He failed to qualify for 1950 Indianapolis 500. Gregg died in 2002.

Ludwig Fischer (b. 1915) died on this day in 1991 and Duane Carter (b. 1913), driver with one podium in Indy 500, died in 1993.

Australian Grand Prix 1998 was held on this day. Debut for two rejects, Tora Takagi and Esteban Tuero!
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Re: Reject Birthday Topic

Postby dinizintheoven » 09 Mar 2011, 01:22

This is not a birthday, but there's something else you might have missed.

20 years ago to this day - on the morning of 8th March 1991, the people of Portugal celebrated. They had their first Formula 1 driver since Mário Veloso de Araújo Cabral, way back in 1964. He was Pedro Chaves, and he was going out onto the track at Phoenix to pre-qualify. If he had no idea of what to expect, he soon would. "He is a capable driver, but what chance has he got?" said the BBC's Grand Prix 91 magazine. With a ridiculously bad Coloni C4 to attempt the job with it, he missed the pre-qualifying time by miles, and so began the story of the least competitive car in the 1991 season. His 13 consecutive DNPQs in a single season had only ever been beaten by Claudio Langes (14 DNPQs in 1990) and Aguri Suzuki (16 DNPQs in 1989) - and that's only because he gave up after the 13th attempt which never even happened.

We will never forget.
James Allen, on his favourite F1 engine of all time:
"...the Life W12, I can't describe the noise to you, but imagine filling your dustbin with nuts and bolts, and then throwing it down the stairs, it was something akin to that!"
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